Tracker Edge Firmware API Reference

One difference between the Tracker One and other Particle devices is that the Tracker One firmware can be used in three different ways:

  • Completely off-the-shelf. With its cloud-based configuration, you can use the firmware as-is with no modifications in some cases.
  • Semi-custom. The Tracker One firmware is customizable on-device making it possible to add new sensors and customize behavior while still making it easy to upgrade the base firmware.
  • Custom. The Tracker One firmware is open-source so you can duplicate and modify it ("fork") for completely custom applications. Or build your own completely from scratch.

This reference guide describes the API for use with semi-custom and custom device firmware.

For an introduction to Tracker Edge Firmware, see the Tracker Edge Tutorial.

Tracker

The Tracker object is a singleton that you access using Tracker::instance(). You must call the init() method from setup() and the loop() method on every loop.

// INCLUDE
#include "tracker.h"

// EXAMPLE
#include "Particle.h"

#include "tracker_config.h"
#include "tracker.h"

SYSTEM_THREAD(ENABLED);
SYSTEM_MODE(SEMI_AUTOMATIC);

PRODUCT_ID(PLATFORM_ID);
PRODUCT_VERSION(1);

SerialLogHandler logHandler(115200, LOG_LEVEL_TRACE, {
    { "app.gps.nmea", LOG_LEVEL_INFO },
    { "app.gps.ubx",  LOG_LEVEL_INFO },
    { "ncp.at", LOG_LEVEL_INFO },
    { "net.ppp.client", LOG_LEVEL_INFO },
});

void setup()
{
    Tracker::instance().init();

    Particle.connect();
}

void loop()
{
    Tracker::instance().loop();
}

init() - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
void Tracker::init();

// EXAMPLE
Tracker::instance().init();

You must call the init() method from setup() in your main application file.

loop() - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
void loop();

// EXAMPLE
Tracker::instance().loop()

You must call the loop() method from loop() in your main application file.

You can add your own code to loop, however you should avoid using delay() or other functions that block. If you would like to publish your own events (separate from the location events), you can use the Tracker cloud service to publish safely without blocking the loop.

stop() - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
int stop();

Stops the tracker location and motion services. If you do this, the device will no longer publish based on location change or motion events.

getModel() - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
uint32_t getModel();

Gets the model of Tracker.

Model Code Description
0x0001 Tracker SoM Evaluation Board
0x0002 Tracker One
0xFFFF Tracker SoM

getVariant() - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
uint32_t getVariant();

Gets the variant of the Tracker. This is current 0x0001 for all devices.

cloudService - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
CloudService cloudService;

Use this to access the CloudService object. The cloud service makes it easy to do non-blocking publishes from your code, in addition to the built-in location publishes.

location - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
TrackerLocation location;

// EXAMPLE
Tracker::instance().location.regLocGenCallback(locationGenerationCallback);

Use this to access the TrackerLocation object. Note that there are two different services, LocationService and TrackerLocation.

The TrackerLocation is typically used to register a location generation callback; this allows custom data to be added to the location publish.

locationService - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
LocationService locationService;

// EXAMPLE
LocationStatus locationStatus;
Tracker::instance().locationService.getStatus(locationStatus);
Log.info("GPS lock=%d", locationStatus.locked);

Use this to access the LocationService object. Note that there are two different services, LocationService and TrackerLocation.

The LocationService is normally configured from the console to enable features like publish on movement outside radius. These settings are made in the console per-product, though they also can be overridden per-device from the cloud.

You may want to use the LocationService directly to query GNSS status (fix or not) as well as the most recent location data from your user firmware.

shipping - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
TrackerShipping shipping;

// EXAMPLE
Tracker::instance().shipping.enter();

Use this to access the TrackerShipping object. You will rarely need to do this because shipping mode is typically managed from the console.

Since the Tracker One has a LiPo battery inside the case, and the case is screwed together, it's inconvenient to unplug the battery. Shipping mode puts the device in a very low power mode (even less than sleep mode) by using the power management controller (PMIC) to disconnect the battery. Shipping mode can be enabled from the console, so you don't need to have a custom firmware build to enter shipping mode. Note that you can only exit shipping mode by externally powering a Tracker One by USB or the M8 connector.

You might want to use the API if you have a physical button to enter shipping mode on a custom device. You could have the button handler in your user firmware call tracking.shipping.enter(); to enter shipping mode locally.

Warning: Particle has discovered an issue with GPIO current leakage through Tracker One's M8 connector that affects Tracker One v1.0 devices manufactured prior to August 31, 2020 and can adversely affect the use of shipping mode for devices that use the M8 connection to an external peripheral device. For more information see TAN002 - Tracker One v1.0 Shipping Mode.

configService - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
ConfigService configService;

Use this to access the ConfigService object. You will rarely need to do this as the Configuration Service is what manages synchronizing configuration changes made in the cloud with the device. It normally happens automatically and you will not generally have to make configuration service calls from user firmware.

motionService - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
MotionService motionService;

Use this to access the MotionService object. You will rarely need to do this because the motion detection mode is normally controlled by the configuration service from the cloud. For example, you can set the Tracker to publish on movement, but this setting is normally made from a configuration in the console, not from user firmware.

rtc - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
AM1805 rtc;

Use this to access the AM1805 (Real-Time Clock and Hardware Watchdog) object. This object can only be used for the watchdog; the rest of the RTC functions are managed by Device OS directly.

rgb - Tracker

// PROTOTYPE 
TrackerRGB rgb;

Use this to access the TrackerRGB object. You will rarely need to do this because the RGB LED mode is normally controlled by the configuration service from the cloud. For example, the RGB LED can be set to Particle mode (breathing cyan, for example), or the Tracker mode (RGB LED shows cellular signal strength) but this setting is normally made from a configuration in the console, not from user firmware.

Tracker Functions

There are also global functions available.

getTemperature()

// INCLUDE
#include "tracker_core.h"

// PROTOTYPE
float get_temperature();

On the Tracker One, returns the temperature using the thermistor on the Tracker Carrier board. Value is a floating point number in degrees Celsius.

Note that this is the temperature on the board, within the enclosure, and will typically be several degrees warmer than the ambient temperature.

CloudService

The CloudService is initialized by Tracker so you don't need to set it up, but you may want use some methods for non-blocking publish from your code. You can also register a custom command handler:

regCommandCallback - CloudService

// INCLUDE
#include "cloud_service.h"

// CALLBACK PROTOTYPE
typedef std::function<int(CloudServiceStatus status, JSONValue *, const void *context)> cloud_service_cb_t;

// PROTOTYPE
int regCommandCallback(const char *name, cloud_service_cb_t cb, uint32_t req_id=0, uint32_t timeout_ms=0, const void *context=nullptr);

template <typename T>
int regCommandCallback(const char *name,
    int (T::*cb)(CloudServiceStatus status, JSONValue *, const void *context),
    T *instance,
    uint32_t req_id=0,
    uint32_t timeout_ms=0,
    const void *context=nullptr);

// STATUS CODES
enum CloudServiceStatus {
    SUCCESS = 0,
    FAILURE, // publish to Particle cloud failed, etc
    TIMEOUT, // waiting for application response, etc
};

When viewing a device in the console, in the functions and variables area on the right, is the cmd box.

Some commands you can enter into the box:

Command Purpose
{"cmd":"enter_shipping"} Enter shipping mode
{"cmd":"get_loc"} Gets the location now (regardless of settings)

Using regCommandCallback is an alternative to using Particle.function. One advantage is that cmd handlers are always in JSON format and the JSON parameters are automatically parsed and passed to your callback.

TrackerLocation

The TrackerLocation service is initialized by Tracker so you don't need to set it up, but you may want use the method for registering a callback to add custom data to location publishes.

regLocGenCallback() - TrackerLocation

// PROTOTYPE
int regLocGenCallback(
    std::function<void(
        JSONWriter&, LocationPoint &, const void *)>,
    const void *context=nullptr);

template <typename T>
int regLocGenCallback(
    void (T::*cb)(JSONWriter&, LocationPoint &, const void *),
    T *instance,
    const void *context=nullptr);

// EXAMPLE
void locationGenerationCallback(JSONWriter &writer, 
    LocationPoint &point, const void *context); // Forward declaration

void setup()
{
    Tracker::instance().init();
    Tracker::instance().location.regLocGenCallback(locationGenerationCallback);

    Particle.connect();
}

void loop()
{
    Tracker::instance().loop();
}

void locationGenerationCallback(JSONWriter &writer, 
    LocationPoint &point, const void *context)
{
    writer.name("speed").value(point.speed, 2);
}

Registers a function or method to be called to add custom data to a location publish.

regLocPubCallback - TrackerLocation

// PROTOTYPE
int regLocPubCallback(
    cloud_service_send_cb_t cb, 
    const void *context=nullptr);

template <typename T>
int regLocPubCallback(
    int (T::*cb)(CloudServiceStatus status, JSONValue *, 
        const char *, const void *context),
        T *instance,
    const void *context=nullptr);

Registers a function to be called back after the next location publish attempt with success or failure indication.


enum CloudServiceStatus {
    SUCCESS = 0,
    FAILURE, // publish to Particle cloud failed, etc
    TIMEOUT, // waiting for application response, etc
};

LocationService

The LocationService is initialized by Tracker so you don't need to set it up, but you may want use it to find the GNSS information such as fix status and the most recent location data from user firmware.

getLocation() - LocationService

// PROTOTYPE
int getLocation(LocationPoint& point);

LocationPoint - LocationService

// DEFINTION
struct LocationPoint {
    int locked;
    time_t epochTime;
    LocationTimescale timeScale;
    float latitude;
    float longitude;
    float altitude;
    float speed;
    float heading;
    float horizontalAccuracy;
    float verticalAccuracy;
};
Type Field Description
int locked Indication of GNSS locked status (1=lock/fix obtained)
time_t epochTime Epoch time from device sources
LocationTimescale timeScale Epoch timescale
float latitude Point latitude in degrees
float longitude Point longitude in degrees
float altitude Point altitude in meters
float speed Point speed in meters per second
float heading Point heading in degrees
float horizontalAccuracy Point horizontal accuracy in meters
float verticalAccuracy Point vertical accuracy in meters

LocationTimescale - LocationService

// DEFINITION
enum class LocationTimescale {
    TIMESCALE_UTC,
    TIMESCALE_TAI,
    TIMESCALE_GPS,
    TIMESCALE_GLOSNASS,
    TIMESCALE_GS,
    TIMESCALE_BD,
};

// EXAMPLE
if (locationPoint.timeScale == LocationTimescale::TIMESCALE_GPS) {
    Log.info("is GPS");
}
Enumeration Description
TIMESCALE_UTC Coordinated Universal Time
TIMESCALE_TAI International Atomic Time
TIMESCALE_GPS Global Positioning System (United States)
TIMESCALE_GLOSNASS Global Navigation System (Russia)
TIMESCALE_GS Galileo System (European Union)
TIMESCALE_BD BeiDou (China)

getStatus() - LocationService

// PROTOTYPE
int getStatus(LocationStatus& status);

// EXAMPLE
LocationStatus locationStatus;
Tracker::instance().locationService.getStatus(locationStatus);
Log.info("GPS lock=%d", locationStatus.locked);

Get the status of the GNSS, including whether it's powered on and has a fix. The LocationStatus object is filled in by this method.

LocationStatus - LocationService

// DEFINITION
struct LocationStatus {
    int powered;
    int locked; 
};

The LocationStatus struct is filled in by getStatus(). It has two fields that contain boolean values (0 = false, 1 = true):

Field Description
powered The GNSS has power turned on (1) or off (0)
locked The GNSS has lock or fix (1) or not (0)

TrackerSleep

The TrackerSleep object manages sleep mode on the Tracker SoM and Tracker One.

You can find out more in the Tracker Sleep Tutorial.

isSleepDisabled() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
bool isSleepDisabled();

// EXAMPLE
if (!TrackerSleep::instance().isSleepDisabled()) {
    // Execute this code when sleep is enabled
}

Sleep mode is enabled in the cloud configuration settings. To determine of it is enabled from your code, call isSleepDisabled(). This allows you to customize your code depending on how the configuration is set in the cloud.

This call just checks the value of a variable so you do not need to cache the result; you can call this frequently if needed.

isFullWakeCycle() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
bool isFullWakeCycle();

// EXAMPLE
if (TrackerSleep::instance().isFullWakeCycle()) {
    // Do extra processing on full wake cycle
}

The maximum location update frequency is determined from the cloud configuration. When waking up from external sources such as motion (IMU), BLE, GPIO pin interrupts, etc. it's possible to do a short wake cycle to handle this interrupt, then go back to sleep without turning on the cellular modem. This preserves battery power and also prevents excessive reconnection. It is possible for your mobile carrier to ban your SIM for aggressive reconnection if it does a full reconnection more often than every 10 minutes.

You can determine if this is a full wake cycle (connecting to cellular) using isFullWakeCycle(). To force a full wake cycle, use forceFullWakeCycle().

forceFullWakeCycle() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int forceFullWakeCycle();

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().forceFullWakeCycle();

The maximum location update frequency is determined from the cloud configuration. When waking up from external sources such as motion (IMU), BLE, GPIO pin interrupts, etc. it's possible to do a short wake cycle to handle this interrupt, then go back to sleep without turning on the cellular modem. This preserves battery power and also prevents excessive reconnection. It is possible for your mobile carrier to ban your SIM for aggressive reconnection if it does a full reconnection more often than every 10 minutes.

To force a full wake cycle, use forceFullWakeCycle(). This should be done with care, as it will override the cloud settings for minimum publish duration, which may cause aggressive reconnection, excessive data usage, or shortened battery life.

Forcing a full wake cycle will shift the full wake period. For example, if you have a minimum publish period of 15 minutes and force a full wake cycle prematurely, then next full wake cycle will be 15 minutes from now (not from the previous full wake).

wakeFor(pin) - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int wakeFor(pin_t pin, InterruptMode mode);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().wakeFor(D5, RISING);

Set a pin as a wake source. The mode is one of:

  • CHANGE to trigger the interrupt whenever the pin changes value.
  • RISING to trigger when the pin goes from low to high.
  • FALLING for when the pin goes from high to low.

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.

Waking by a pin still is subject to the minimum publish period. If the minimum publish period has not been met yet, then this will be a short wake cycle and the device will wake, but will not connect to cellular. Your code can override this by calling forceFullWakeCycle().

To stop using a pin as a wake-up source, use ignore().

Waking from GPIO is common if you have a hardware sensor connected to a GPIO that you want to use for a wake source. If you have an I2C or SPI sensor, you may instead want to use wakeAt() to wake the MCU, read the sensor, and go back to sleep. Note that this also will obey the minimum publish period so you can wake frequently using wakeAt() without excessive reconnection or battery use.

ignore(pin) - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int ignore(pin_t pin);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().ignore(D5);

To no longer use pin as a wake source, reversing a wakeFor call, use ignore().

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.

wakeForBle() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int wakeForBle();

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().wakeForBle();

Enable BLE (Bluetooth LE) as a wake-up source.

In addition to wake on BLE, this keeps the BLE subsystem activated so the nRF52 MCU can wake up briefly to:

  • Advertise when in BLE peripheral mode. This allows the MCU to wake when a connection is attempted.
  • Keep an already open connection alive, in both central and peripheral mode. This allows the MCU to wake when data arrives on the connection or when the connection is lost.

This brief wake-up only services the radio. User firmware and Device OS do not resume execution if waking only to service the radio. If the radio receives incoming data or connection attempt packets, then the MCU completely wakes up in order to handle those events.

To stop using BLE as a wake-up source, use ignoreBle().

ignoreBle() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int ignoreBle();

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().ignoreBle();

Stop using BLE as a wake-up source that was enabled using wakeForBle().

wakeFor(network) - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int wakeFor(network_interface_t netif);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().wakeFor(NETWORK_INTERFACE_CELLULAR);

Sets wake-on-network mode. This will allow incoming data on the cellular interface such as a function call, variable request, subscribed event, or OTA request to wake the device from sleep. This requires keeping the cellular modem active, which will increase power usage, however it will speed up reconnection and eliminates issues with aggressive reconnection.

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code. Only NETWORK_INTERFACE_CELLULAR is supported; using a different network interface will result in a SYSTEM_ERROR_NOT_SUPPORTED error.

ignore(network) - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int ignore(network_interface_t netif);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().ignore(NETWORK_INTERFACE_CELLULAR);

Disables wake-on-network mode.

wakeFor(SystemSleepFlag) - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int wakeFor(SystemSleepFlag flag);

Adds a SystemSleepFlag to the sleep settings.

The only supported flag is:

  • SystemSleepFlag::WAIT_CLOUD

You do not need to specify this as graceful disconnect mode is used in Tracker Edge, and this also makes sure all cloud messages have been sent.

pauseSleep() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int pauseSleep();

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().pauseSleep();

Normally, the post publish execution time determines how long to stay awake. If you want to force the device to stay awake, your firmware can use pauseSleep(). To resume allowing sleep to occur again, call resumeSleep().

To prevent sleep for an additional number of seconds, you can use extendExecution().

resumeSleep() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int resumeSleep();

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().resumeSleep();

Normally, the post-publish execution time determines how long to stay awake. If you want to force the device to stay awake, your firmware can use pauseSleep().

To resume allowing sleep to occur again, call resumeSleep(). If the post-publish execution time has not been met yet, resume sleep only allows it to occur when the time is met. It does not force an immediate sleep.

extendExecution() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
uint32_t extendExecution(uint32_t seconds) 

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().extendExecution(10);

Normally, the post-publish execution time determines how long to stay awake. If you want to add additional time to this period, you can use `extendExecution(). This only affects this sleep cycle. On the next sleep - wake cycle the default will be restored from the cloud. You can only make the period longer, not shorter, with this call.

If you want to control staying awake from code instead of by time, your firmware can use pauseSleep() and resumeSleep(). If you want to extend execution for a certain number of seconds from now, use extendExecutionFromNow.

extendExecutionFromNow - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
uint32_t extendExecutionFromNow(uint32_t seconds, bool force = false) 

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().extendExecutionFromNow(30);

Normally, the post-publish execution time determines how long to stay awake. To stay awake for additional time from now, use extendExecutionFromNow().

For example, TrackerSleep::instance().extendExecutionFromNow(30) will extend execution to 30 seconds from now, if this is longer than the configured post-publish execution time.


// EXAMPLE - Can shorten execution window
TrackerSleep::instance().extendExecutionFromNow(2, true);

If you want to set the execution time, with the possibility of shortening the post-publish execution time, pass true for the force parameter.

If you want to control staying awake from code instead of by time, your firmware can use pauseSleep() and resumeSleep(). If you want to extend execution for a certain number of seconds, use extendExecution.

wakeAt() - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
TrackerSleepError wakeAtSeconds(unsigned int uptimeSeconds);
TrackerSleepError wakeAtMilliseconds(system_tick_t milliseconds);
TrackerSleepError wakeAtMilliseconds(uint64_t milliseconds);
TrackerSleepError wakeAt(std::chrono::milliseconds ms);

// EXAMPLE
// Wake 60 seconds from now (60000 ms) if earlier than the currently schedule wake
TrackerSleep::instance().wakeAtMilliseconds(System.millis() + 60000);

Normally the wake time is determined by the minimum location update frequency in the cloud configuration. You can adjust this from code using the variations of wakeAt().

The next wake time is always calculated using System.millis(). This does not rely on the system real-time clock being set, and is not affected by daylight saving time or timezones. It is a 64-bit time millisecond values that will effectively never roll over to 0. Since sleep mode uses ULTRA_LOW_POWER mode, the System.millis() counter continues to increment while in sleep. The System.millis() value does reset to 0 on reset or cold boot, but the sleep cycles also reset in that condition.

If you have other wake sources such as movement (IMU), GPIO, BLE, network, etc. you can still wake earlier than this time.

If you schedule a wake before the maximum location update frequency, the wake will be a short wake cycle, where only the device wakes and a cellular connection is enabled. You can override this during your short wake by using forceFullWakeCycle().

You may want to use this feature to take the value of a more complicated sensor that requires external power, or uses I2C or SPI. You can frequently wake using wakeAt() but only turn on cellular and publish at the maximum location update frequency. This of course requires that you store these values for later publishing. An example of this can be found in the short wake with less frequent publish example.

Returns:

  • TrackerSleepError::NONE Time was scheduled
  • TrackerSleepError::TIME_IN_PAST Given time happened in the past
  • TrackerSleepError::TIME_SKIPPED Given time happens later than a sooner wake request

SleepCallback - TrackerSleep

// DEFINITION
using SleepCallback = std::function<void(TrackerSleepContext context)>;

// PROTOTYPE
void mySleepCallback(TrackerSleepContext context);

// TrackerSleepContext
struct TrackerSleepContext {
    TrackerSleepReason reason;
    size_t loop;
    uint64_t lastSleepMs;
    uint64_t lastWakeMs;
    uint64_t nextWakeMs;
    uint64_t modemOnMs;
};

// TrackerSleepReason
enum class TrackerSleepReason {
    PREPARE_SLEEP,
    CANCEL_SLEEP,
    SLEEP,
    WAKE,
    STATE_TO_CONNECTING,
    STATE_TO_EXECUTION,
    STATE_TO_SLEEP,
    STATE_TO_SHUTDOWN
};

Your firmware can register functions to be called during sleep-related events. The callback function has this prototype and the TrackerSleepContext specifies information about the sleep. Note that the data passed to the callback is a copy of the current state; you cannot affect a change by modifying it directly.

  • reason The reason for the call, so a single callback function can be registered for multiple purposes.

    • TrackerSleepReason::PREPARE_SLEEP Preparing to sleep. You should put lengthy operations and anything that changes the sleep duration here.
    • TrackerSleepReason::CANCEL_SLEEP Sleep was started, but then canceled. If you turned off peripherals in PREPARE_SLEEP, turn then back on.
    • TrackerSleepReason::SLEEP Last step before sleep. Avoid doing anything lengthy here.
    • TrackerSleepReason::WAKE Just woke from sleep.
    • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_CONNECTING for state change handlers, entering the CONNECTING state.
    • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_EXECUTION for state change handlers, entering the EXECUTION state.
    • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_SLEEP for state change handlers, entering the SLEEP state.
    • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_SHUTDOWN for state change handlers, entering the SHUTDOWN state (about to enter shipping mode).
  • loop Incremented on each call to loop.

  • lastSleepMs The last time, in milliseconds, the system went to sleep.
  • lastWakeMs The last time, in milliseconds, the system woke from sleep.
  • nextWakeMs The next time, in milliseconds, the system will wake from sleep.
  • modemOnMs The time, in milliseconds, when the modem was turned on.

The times in milliseconds are values from System.millis(). This does not rely on the system real-time clock being set, and is not affected by daylight saving time or timezones. It is a 64-bit time millisecond values that will effectively never roll over to 0. Since sleep mode uses ULTRA_LOW_POWER mode, the System.millis() counter continues to increment while in sleep. The System.millis() value does reset to 0 on reset or cold boot, but the sleep cycles also reset in that condition.

registerSleepPrepare - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int registerSleepPrepare(SleepCallback callback);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().registerSleepPrepare(myCallback);

Register a callback to be called while preparing for sleep. You can register the same function for more than one purpose and use the reason field of the context to determine what occurred.

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.

Any lengthy operations should be done in the registerSleepPrepare callback instead of the registerSleep callback. The reason is that the sleep duration is calculated after sleep prepare, so preparation steps will not cause the sleep time to drift.

If you wish to update the sleep duration to allow for a short wake cycle, you must do it from the sleep prepare callback. You cannot set the sleep duration from the final sleep callback. An example of this can be found in the short wake with less frequent publish example.


// Cancel the pending sleep
TrackerSleep::instance().updateNextWake(0);

From the sleep prepare callback, call updateNextWake(0) to cancel this sleep and stay awake instead. The sleep cancel callback will be called.

If you are powering down external hardware, and the operation is fast, you may want to use registerSleep so you don't have to worry about canceling.

If you have a graceful shutdown process that takes more than a hundred milliseconds or so, you should use registerSleepPrepare. You need to handle both the registerSleepWake and registerSleepCancel to turn your external peripheral back on if you use registerSleepPrepare.

registerSleepCancel - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int registerSleepCancel(SleepCallback callback);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().registerSleepCancel(myCallback);

Register a callback to be called immediately after cancelling sleep.

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.

If you powered down external hardware in the registerSleepPrepare callback, you should undo that operation here and power it back on, as the device will resume normal execution when sleep is canceled.

registerSleep - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int registerSleep(SleepCallback callback);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().registerSleep(myCallback);

Register a callback to be called immediately prior to going to sleep. You can register the same function for more than one purpose and use the reason field of the context to determine what occurred.

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.

You should avoid doing any lengthy operations in the registerSleep callback. You cannot cancel sleep from this callback, and you cannot change the sleep duration from this callback.

If you are powering down an external peripheral and the operation is fast, such as changing a GPIO that controls a MOSFET or load switch, you can do that safely from the registerSleep callback.

registerWake - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int registerWake(SleepCallback callback);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().registerWake(myCallback);

Register a callback to be called immediately after waking from sleep.

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.

If you powered down external hardware in the registerSleepPrepare or registerSleep callback, you should undo that operation here and power it back on.

Tracker sleep uses ULTRA_LOW_POWER mode, so execution continues after sleep with variables intact. It does not run setup() again.

registerStateChange - TrackerSleep

// PROTOTYPE
int registerStateChange(SleepCallback callback);

// EXAMPLE
TrackerSleep::instance().registerStateChange(myCallback);

Register a callback to be called immediately after sleep state change. You can find out the state being transitioned into using the context.reason field, which will be one of:

  • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_CONNECTING for state change handlers, entering the CONNECTING state.
  • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_EXECUTION for state change handlers, entering the EXECUTION state.
  • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_SLEEP for state change handlers, entering the SLEEP state.
  • TrackerSleepReason::STATE_TO_SHUTDOWN for state change handlers, entering the SHUTDOWN state (about to enter shipping mode).

Returns SYSTEM_ERROR_NONE (0) on success, or a non-zero error code.